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Invitation: The Center for Development Studies Lecture Series, Second Lecture: “Stories in the Gardens: Narratives of Selves and Others through Cultivated Plants in Palestine”.

Invitation: The Center for Development Studies Lecture Series, Second Lecture: “Stories in the Gardens: Narratives of Selves and Others through Cultivated Plants in Palestine”.

The Center for Development Studies, Birzeit University, cordially invites you to the second lecture of its’ lecture series. The lecture is entitled “Stories in the Gardens: Narratives of Selves and Others through Cultivated Plants in Palestine”. by Cannelle Labuthie, a PhD candidate in anthropology at the University of Paris – Paris VII Diderot (France). The lecture will be moderated by Imad Sayrafi, researcher at the Center for Development Studies (CDS) –Birzeit University.

Date: 25/11/2020, 5:00 PM (Palestine Time)

Note: This Lecture will be held in English

Zoom Link: Meeting ID: 879 4085 3202 Passcode: 505332 or

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87940853202?pwd=NkJibWlxRW5YeXJQZXppeG5HcTZYUT09

What do the Palestinian gardens tell us on the process of identity constructions? Despite the sharp drop of the agricultural sector in the economy, cultivating the land remains a source of subsistence and resilience in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. By studying the history of the diffusion and circulations of some plants harvested in those gardens, this lecture aims at contributing to the renewal of research on Palestinian agricultural history. To do so, we will take some vegetables, fruits or field crops as depositary of plural narratives. Those stories are strongly rooted in the land, practices and knowledge of the cultivators, women and men, who have grown local plant varieties in the oPt. International scientific, political or economic actors have also participated in shaping those narratives. While analyzing the global and local history of some of those plants, I will unfold three different categories of narrative: the narratives of nativeness, the narratives of progress and the narratives of tradition

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